Occupy Austin at City Hall

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Occupy Austin, a set on Flickr.

I arrived about 11am at Austin City Hall for the #OccupyAustin event. The occupiers numbered about 300. There were about 5 news trucks from local Austin media who were browsing the crowd for interesting looking characters to interview. The APD was also out in force. After exchanging several emails last night with “organizers” (my word) I was most curious to see how organized this group actually was.  I spoke to “Ronny” after watching him address the crowd about the 3pm General Assembly. He said they are still working on an actual structure but they have formed committees that cover increasingly specific issues conducted by moderators and all decisions are reached by consensus. He handed me a print out of what had come of the first General Assembly held just a few days ago. It described the procedures, the structure of “facilliation teams”, hand signals for communications and an introduction to their purpose. It begins:

As a group we have decided to take n the form of Occupy Wall Street movement to have all planning and activities (from the logistics of the operation of the occupation to the planning of activities) take place through committees. The General Assembly is a gathering for these committees to report back to the group as a whole on their progress and receive consensus approval to move forward with activities that affect the occupation as a whole.

I asked about the trouble of “representing” a group that claims no leader and he acknowledged the obvious problem. Just minutes before a young woman with an Occupy Austin media pass addressed the crowd over a document being circulated that was not “approved” by the general assembly. You could immediately since her frustration as she was met with grumbles and comments from people who wanted to make it clear no one spoke for them.

My main issue with any protest movement is a lack of, whats referred to in the organizing world as, “action items”. Ronny assured me that each assembly ends with action items drawn from consensus. Tomorrow Oct. 7th they will march to Bank of America and ask customers to switch to a local credit union instead of supporting corporate banks. Another speaker suggested shopping at farmers’ markets and keeping money within the community. I think as long as the group stays flexible and organic enough to absorb the general discontent of Wall Street it can maintain successful less they fall in the trap of alienation by affiliation.

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Occupy Wallstreet (Anywhere)

Today is #OccupyAustin and as I talk to local politicos about the burgeoning new “occupy[insertyourtown]” movement we speculate on how long it will be before some highly funded, issue specific group comes in and marginalizes it like the TEA Party. Within the Occupy Austin movement there is a clear structure being created with a General Assembly that meets daily and specific committees who democratically discuss issues and make plans. They have a website and are highly motivated and engaged. Their facebook page already has over 7,000 fans and today’s event has over 4,000 RSVPs. It will be interesting to see who is behind such a speedy effort to first occupy the URL OccuppyAustin.org then to create such a content heavy web presence.

The in-cohesive nature and lack of pure ideology are part of what gives these movements credibility. You can not cut the head from a headless snake, but groups like Move On are trying to shape themselves into just that. As we have seen so far celebrities and unions have “joined the fight” though no specific agenda has been outlined. Isn’t the point here though, that people are just tired of failed leadership at the hands of greed? Do they really need an agenda or specific reforms to push? Like a friend said,  “What matters is these people are getting off their asses.” At the end of the day public policy is no overnight read and is generally left for politicians, activists (which anyone with spare time can be) and business ‘leaders’ to work out. Average working class people, if they in fact have work, do not have time to become political scientists.

After a historic election of “hope and change” how did we get to a point where we have two separate organic movements against our nations establishment?  Ladies and gentlemen this is nothing new. It happened at the end of the Roman Empire as well. The young educated class who could not find work lost respect for “Roman virtue” when they saw it was really just a farce to keep the common order of things as they were. There was no real meritocracy. All any of these people want is a job where they do not feel like they are getting the screws. I see pundits refer to them as communist, socialists and anti-capitalist as if they just hate rich people. Sure those types are drawn to large gathers and protests in general. However, I suspect that these folks wouldn’t mind bonuses for bank executives if they weren’t just laid off by a bank, or if wasn’t funded by taxpayer bailout money. This is what people are tired of. Watching people who made bad decisions redistribute the nations wealth amongst themselves.

Simple question: Would our economy be in this shape if these financial executives were doing a “good job” or at least one worth 10 million a year?

Bush said it:

Some workers are being left behind in the booming economy and the disparity between the rich and the poor is growing…The fact is that income inequality is real. It has been rising for more than 25 years…The earnings gap is now twice as wide as it was in 1980. Bush said, adding that more education and training can lift peoples’ salaries.

Reagan said it:

Now try it yourself…

Why we tax the rich- for dummies

Why should we tax the rich? Its a question that reminds me of a childhood argument I had with my parents every time they bought me a new pair of shoes. I wanted the latest (and most expensive) Nike tennis so they would always remind me of how much it cost to make them, how much some poor kid got paid and how much us suckers were willing to pay.  My elementary response was, “would those kids even have a job if it weren’t for Nike?” Unfortunately at this point I can see any of the GOP candidates (with minor exception) respond the same way.  Even as a child I could see the Conservative and Republican ideological brands were shinier but it was years before I considered the substance inside the slick packaging. Where did all that money go, were these kids really being treated fairly, did my purchase really affect the price and does it all really even matter anyway? The answer is yes it does matter, because we have entered a world where regardless of your ideology or the corporate tax rate the American standard of living can not be realized for the same wages companies can pay workers overseas. This is my anecdote for the situation that has led to shrieks of ‘class warfare’ on all sides and the latest brewing economic movement to “#OccupyWallStreet“.  It comes down to the simple fact that if folks can’t feed there families and afford basics like transportation, education and insurance after working 40hrs a week there will be more working class uprisings. When working and middle-class people have jobs they don’t have time to riot, but give them 6 months of watching their family suffer and you bet they will take to the streets.
Continue reading “Why we tax the rich- for dummies”

Class Warfare: Do we have to pick sides?

We are hearing a lot about “job creators” but what about “wealth creators”? Those are the many hands that perform the jobs and create the wealth that gets funneled to the top and fails to trickle down. It isn’t about over-taxation, its about labor costs and the American middle-class standard of living is just too high for the bottom line. There are short term solutions to the economic recession like rebuilding infrastructure; but the foundation of our new economy’s longterm growth will be small business. They are the most likely to hire during growth, less likely to layoff employees without exhausting all other options and they provide character and tradition to communities.

Continue reading “Class Warfare: Do we have to pick sides?”

A Tea Party Rally for Change in SETX?

While on our trip to Turkey my father (State Representative Joe Deshotel) received an invitation to speak Monday, September 12th at a Tea Party rally billed as a “‘Return to Community-Making a Difference,’ a Southeast Texas TEA Party rally to remember 9-11 and refocus attention on the local community honoring 9/11”.  The invitation was from former Jefferson County Republican Party Chair and current Tax-Assessor collector Shane Howard. I happen to have a personal relationship with Shane as I served myself as Executive Director of the Jefferson County Democratic Party and we debated weekly on Fox 4.
Continue reading “A Tea Party Rally for Change in SETX?”

UPDATE: Tar Sands Keystone XL

Ok, so I take off for my trip to Turkey with plans to blog (follow hashtag #YoungTurksTravel on twitter) and all of a sudden the Keystone pipeline becomes part of the national dialogue. Thanks to Gator for the kind words and link to my blog on this subject. I’ll have to make this quick as I am on a layover using limited free wifi in the Amsterdam airport, so please excuse any typos.
Continue reading “UPDATE: Tar Sands Keystone XL”

Not so smooth…like Keystone XL

“It’s not the easiest thing on Earth for law-abiding folk to come to risk arrest,” –Bill McKibben Environmentalist/protest organizer

Born and raised in Southeast Texas I can attest that a new pipeline is hardly worthy of a headline. This is different, and even with a notable amount of national media attention it is still proving difficult to get the message across. I started on this campaign over a year ago when the State Dept. began holding hearings along the route of the pipeline. At the time several significant issues were brought to their attention including; strip mining in Alberta, chemical leaks to downstream communities, the proposed route’s passage over the Ogallala aquifer, the discrepancies between proposed job creation numbers and ultimately the impact on citizens living near refining sites like Port Arthur.
Continue reading “Not so smooth…like Keystone XL”

That First Step – Citizens REunited

I’ve been wanting to restart my blog again for a while now. Many factors have led to my procrastination not excluding the hours berating pundits on cable news.

I think my point of view is fair and balanced but not just because I say it is. I do my best to site my sources but the biggest obstacle in writing more is the research involved. I will try and keep my posts focused and short.

My main motivation for writing is the void of reasonable voices in popular media. I hear them among friends and in public so I know they are out there. I see ideological bubbles forming even though American’s have more access to information than any other point in history. Today our ability to seek out content that merely reinforces our own prejudices and preconceived notions is disturbing. Its a trend that goes past our instincts to group ourselves but is in fact part of the algorithms used by Google and Facebook to “suggest” content to you. Ultimately this limits choice (aka freedom) and is largely unrepresentative of the diversity of ideas in the market place.

I think buzz words are important and as long as Democrats, liberals, progressives et. al. choose policy explanations over soundbites, Republicans’ message will continue to be effective. As a friend said, if we are explaining we are losing. We must find a constructive way to fight the scorched earth policy towards institutions that represent human progress and personify “we the people”. Democrats will never win as the “anti-government” party and until they remind folks of what good government has done you can bet it all on red.

I’m proud of the fact that I frequently come to agreeable solutions with conservatives because we are generally given false choices that force us to take opposing sides on non-issues.  Non-compromising liberals and conservatives feed the gridlock and prevent government from actually being an aset to the people.

Our challenge now is to define the role of government and cut out the rest. The real tyrant we face is corporate money in our elections. Corporations are not immoral but they are amoral and do not represent real human interest. The government has been a defenseless whipping boy in our recent political discussions regarding “class warfare”.

The Supreme Court was supremely wrong in Citizens United when they decided to treat companies like people. Just know when you hear its beneficiaries say “private sector” they really mean “big business” and when they say “government” they really mean “the people”. So start listening closely because this is an all out battle for the hearts, minds and the soul of our nation.

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